Corporate Partnerships

Strategic business partnerships

We can bring your CSR values to life and create a long term partnership. A longer term partnership is the most rewarding experience as you can see year after year how your support grows exponentially. We can engage your employees, organise corporate trips, volunteer days and tailor make one of our projects to suit your needs.

See this video of Annoushka Ducas who has partnered with us for 4 years

Charity partnerships

We have been very successful with all our programmes and have learned an enormous amount of knowledge in the past 10 years. We have been able to turn our under performing schools with extremely poor students into academic award winning schools. We have learned exactly how much support to give without creating dependency on aid. We have learned how to make our programmes more sustainable and how to get some of them fully sustainable and independent.

We often get asked how we managed these results, so now we have started “SHARE” Give A Future where we offer consultancy services to other NGO’s to share our knowledge and experience.

Make a donation

We have many donors of many different levels of support: from sponsoring one child a month to supporting a whole programme for several years. We can tailor any proposal to any programme and have done so for over 10 years. We love reporting on our work and take impact measurement very seriously. We constantly collect data to know exactly how we are doing. Contact us and we will write you a tailored proposal for the level of funding you are thinking about: sferrario@giveafuture.org.uk

Brand cooperation

We are always interested in adding value to other brands by creating an association with our projects. This could be a link to our women in the microfinance programme with another brand that wants to create a message about strong women leadership or an association with our students…the sky is the limit and we have a creative team who can brainstorm with you how to best create a brand cooperation.

Creating Shared Value in Addis Ababa: Impact investing into a quality education and the real estate boom

Addis Ababa is a fast growing city in a rapidly developing country, growing by more than 10% every year since 2004.Since the fall of the communist regime in 1991 the country has been growing exponentially since 1992 and is posed to become a middle income country by 2025.Ethiopia has experienced this major growth by investments in mainly infrastructure and also agriculture.Real estate is booming and the city is changing rapidly.

People are investing in flats and houses and a middle class is emerging.We are investing into a quality education for primary, secondary and tertiary education in Addis Ababa and have more than 10 years experience we can contribute to this rapidly developing city of Addis Ababa.Rising rents and the need to find bigger compounds to expand our three schools are factors that are holding us back.We have won many awards for our outstanding work and achievements by turning our schools into academic award winning schools.

In order to make our schools sustainable for the future we need to get the real estate for the school compounds sorted out as we cannot keep on renting or expanding due to a lack of space.There is a WIN WIN proposition and value creation for both parties: for schools to become part of real estate developments as real estate value goes up with quality schools functioning at the centre of new communities.

This is generating economic value in a way that also produces value for society by addressing its challenges. A shared value approach reconnects company success with social progress.

In order for Ethiopia to reach its development goals, shared value projects like this one will offer immense support.Shared value could reshape capitalism and its relationship to society. It could also drive the next wave of innovation and productivity growth in the global economy as it opens managers’ eyes to immense human needs that must be met, large new markets to be served, and the internal costs of social deficits—as well as the competitive a